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Google's DeepMind Alpha Go Beats Human

A significant AI advance

Google demonstrates its future capabilities as their DeepMind artificial intelligence has secured its fourth win over a master Go player, in the final of a five match challenge. You can find out more about Google's DeepMind and its applications here

Google DeepMind is a British artificial intelligence company founded in September 2010 as DeepMind Technologies and renamed when it was acquired by Google in 2014. The company has created a neural network that learns how to play games in a similar fashion to humans, as well as a neural network that may be able to access an external memory like a conventional Turing machine, resulting in a computer that mimics the short-term memory of the human brain.

DeepMind states that their system is not pre-programmed whereas other AIs, such as IBM's Deep Blue or Watson, only function within their scope as they were developed for a pre-defined purpose. DeepMind learns from experience, using only raw pixels as data input. The system has been developed using video games, mainly early arcade games. Without altering the code, the AI begins to understand how to play the game, and after some time plays, for a few games (most notably Breakout), a more efficient game than any human ever could. The application of DeepMind's AI to video games is currently for games made in the 1970s and 1980s, such as Space Invaders and Pacman, with work being done on more complex 3D games, such as Doom, which first appeared in the early 1990s.

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